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People Are Sharing What’s Normal In The US But Absolutely Not In Europe (20 Posts)

With travel returning to the world (I hope) as COVID-19 fades (I… hope?), it’s important to remember that your country’s way is not the ONLY way of doing everything. Americans in particular have a reputation for bungling into another culture and demanding the world bend to our cultural norms. But why? When you have this list handy, why would you ever?!

Let’s take a perusal of u/Raphael_Olbert‘s question, “What is usual in America, but isn’t in Europe?

1. The drives

“Driving long distances for things not related to leisure travel.”

 u/namehimgeorge

2. Huge parking lots

“Parking lots larger than the building they serve.”

 u/Ferna_89

3. Toilets

“Amount of water in toilets.”

 u/Enzo-Unversed

4. Garbage disposals

“Garbage disposals in the sink.”

 u/cmac4ster

5. Ice!

“Lots of ice in beverages.”

 u/OlderAndTired

6. Driving age

“Children older than 15 years old can drive a car.”

 u/Mental-Cookie570

7. They don’t leave

“Well, while I was in New York, the waiter took my credit card and left, and I was instantly angry. I thought, ‘WTF?’ It’s strange when someone accepts your card and then turns around in Europe because typically all card operations are performed in front of the cardholder.”

 u/Financial-Shallosa

8. Sit down!

“Standing cashiers. For God’s sake, let those poor people sit down.”

 u/Galad_42

9. Tax

“Not including tax in listed prices—it’s added at the end.”

 u/erichmich

10. Bathrooms

“Public bathrooms that have an inch gap on either side of the door so everyone can see you taking a shit.”

 u/erritstaken

11. Leave us alone

“Waitstaff constantly checking on you, even if it means interrupting a conversation. In Europe, they leave you in peace unless you obviously need something.”

 u/coolhandjennie

12. Small talk

“Making small talk. The first time I went to London, I asked a Starbucks barista how her day was going, and she looked at me like I had a third arm coming out of my neck.”

 u/keto_bagel

13. Food size

“Insanely large portions of food at restaurants.”

 u/tarpy

14. Good ol’ ADA

“Handicap accessibility: curb cuts, ramps, elevators.”

 u/cryptoengineer

15. You’re creepy

“Smiling at people/people watching. In the US, it’s a way to pass time, but in some European cities, you look like a creep (in my experience).”

 u/sephhugh9563

16. Dates

“The date, putting the day after the month. Why is that? It’s the 4th of July, right? So why is it written 7/4?”

 u/WorldlinessOk4494

17. This isn’t actually normal

“The cutlery juggling. US Americans cut their food with the knife in the right hand and fork in the left hand, but then put the knife down and switch the fork to the right hand to eat only with the fork. When they need the knife again, they switch the fork back to their left hand and pick up the knife with their right. They do this several times throughout the meal. Why? And is this done everywhere in the USA?”

 u/AnxiousMoonFairy

18. Staycationing

“Staycations.”

 u/blueXwho

19. Water bottles

“Honestly, reusable water bottles. One of my biggest issues with visiting/living in Europe is I can’t fill up my water jug anywhere. I’m constantly buying plastic bottles, and I hate it.”

 u/loonylunanic

20. Refills

“Free soda refills.”

 u/Few-Owl-7794