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Man Explains How Crazy The Home Buying Experience Is Right Now In Viral TikTok

Shaun Johnson is blowing up on real estate TikTok with a hilarious video satirizing the current housing market.

The comedian goes by @johnsonfiles on TikTok and he posted the video on April 20th.

real estate tiktok

It has almost six million views and 700,000 likes; the people found the entire thing relatable and VERY correct.

One TikToker who recently closed on an overpriced home, wrote, “This is the truest thing I’ve ever seen in my life!”

“Put my house for sale at $650,000, had an offer at $900,000,” said another. “I canceled the sale because I know I wouldn’t find another one during these times.”

In the sketch, Johnson is comparing an apple to a home on the market. As soon as the apple is listed, a bidding war breaks out.

@johnsonfiles / TikTok

People offer way too much money, going all the way up into the hundreds of dollars, before even seeing the apple for inspection.

real estate tiktok

“Is it even worth that?” one bidder asks.

real estate tiktok

Others say they’ve tried making bids on different apples before, but they’re always outbid.

It’s a strongly apt analogy for the ridiculous swing of competition in the current real estate market in the U.S.

https://twitter.com/FairweatherPhD/status/1385267920431992840

The pandemic has exacerbated the issue; more people want to buy homes in order to enjoy their work-from-home lives, interest rates are very low, but there are simply not enough houses to go around.

Basic supply and demand make the market so crazy, people are selling homes for far over initial asking prices and for all-cash!

On Twitter, people laughed … but agreed: this is too real!

https://twitter.com/aaronnorris/status/1385376849266495492?s=20

Speaking as a California resident, I can verify. It’s insane here.

Another Twitter comment read, “It gets better every time! The “Nice try” and California is hilarious.”

One user noted that she “can’t wait for [the market] to correct!” It’s a fair assessment, though she also warned others not to “feel bad for the people who will [lose] big,” which could be, perhaps, callous.